No Room for Error

I’m just sitting here thinking about the holiday season.  It seems as if every year it gets busier and busier and more frantic and people do stupid things because they have too much on their mind.  In the week before Christmas I was almost run down 3 times by cars that almost went through red lights as I walked across a busy intersection on the green light.  I also almost got run down by a reckless driver who backed out of a parking spot at full speed without looking.  I had to run to avoid getting hit.

When our minds are preoccupied, accidents can happen.  We just don’t think.  Not only is it more evident at the holiday season but I think that we who are caregivers can also be so preoccupied that we don’t think straight.  When I talk to any caregiver the number one complaint is how tired, how exhausted they are.  We all know that exhaustion causes us to not think straight.  We can make mistakes without even realizing and mistakes in caregiving can be deadly.

Where am I going with this??  Well,  I have had two incidents happen in looking after my Mom that could have had very adverse reactions.  Many caregivers are also the ones who dole out the medications for the elderly one in their care.  It’s a daunting job and a very serious one.  I look after ALL my Mom’s medications most of which are in blister packs but she also has insulin for me to manage and to administer, nitro patches to remember to put on and take off, blood sugars to monitor, extra medications which are not in the blister packs to give, eye drops to give, and ointments, sedatives, laxatives etc to give.  Sometimes medications are changed mid-month and that means removing a pill from what she gets in the blister pack or adding a pill.  I find all this extremely overwhelming and scary.  Especially after 2 mistakes.

A few weeks ago I administered a dose of insulin only to discover it was an old pen that I was saving because it had a small dose of insulin in it left that I was going to use if her dose went down.  Unfortunately, the pens are only supposed to be out of the fridge for 28 days.  I had no idea how old this pen was.  I panicked royally.  Was the dose I gave going to be effective or was it no good?  Do I give her another dose to cover in case it is no good??  What if her blood sugars drop severely and she falls during the night?  Thank goodness I am blessed to be part of a program where I can talk to a nurse 24/7.  So at 10pm at night I called very upset.  The nurse assured me it should be OK and not to give her any more.  I was assured but only to a point.  It was basically a sleepless night as I kept a watch on Mom to make sure she was OK.  I have learned my lesson.  I do not keep partial pens anymore.  I dispose of any I am not currently using immediately.  That was incident number one.

Incident number two happened just the other day.  We now have a palliative care nurse who can prescribe medications and she prescribed 2 new medications for Mom.  When I picked them up I was in a hurry ( yes, there it is)  and when the cashier asked if I wanted to talk to the pharmacist about these new drugs I declined, saying I would just read the info that came with the pills.  Well, no info was with the pills.  So I looked them up online but was confused a bit between the two and did not fully realize the dangers of one of the drugs.  It was a drug that was NOT to be stopped once started and only gone off of very slowly.  I neglected to read that.  The one night Mom was having trouble so I asked her if she wanted to take one of her new pills.  She declined.  ( She would rather take 100 different vitamins than a prescription pill)  I thought that she could take this pill just whenever she might need it.  The nurse who came to check on Mom ( one comes every week) took a look at the new medications when I told her about them and warned me severely about stopping this particular drug.  In my exhaustion and rush I failed to get the proper information on a new drug for my Mom which might have had dire consequences had I given it to her.  I shudder to think what might have happened had she not been so stubborn about taking new prescription pills.

I guess what I am trying to say in all this is that we as caregivers have no room for error.  Our elderly loved ones are at our mercy and we have to be so careful in what we do each day.  We have to be on top of things, we have to be alert, we have to be informed.  We can’t second guess things.  As I said before it is a daunting job.  And it scares me half to death.  If I did something to cause my Mom harm even by accident I would be forever upset and it would be hard to forgive myself.

I guess that after these incidents I realize just how important our job is and how important it is for us to take care of ourselves as caregivers.  We need to check, check, double check, triple check.  We need to read up on all the medications, their side effects etc and we need to access the supports in our lives like the doctor, pharmacist, nurses etc to get the full picture of what is going on with our loved one.

Having autism,  can make this a very overwhelming affair but I also find that having autism does have it’s positives.  I run my home like a nursing home.  I have alternate plans for care, I have phone numbers posted everywhere,  I have all mom’s agencies info in one place by the front door for any care person to access.  My strong sense of organization comes in handy and my attention to detail ensures that I go over everything a number of times….. Most of the time!  It’s those blips in the system when I am overwhelmed, preoccupied, distracted that can spell disaster.

Caregivers,  look after yourselves.  Look after yourselves well.  Get all the help you can.  And always double check.  And if you’re still not sure – triple check.  As I said we have no room for error.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s